Pastoral Lands Board streamlines pastoral agistment process

Pastoral Lands Board streamlines pastoral agistment process
Friday 30 August 2019

Pastoral Lands Board (PLB) Chair Tim Shackleton has announced the agistment process for pastoralists across the Rangelands had been streamlined to help ensure stock welfare.

Pastoral Lands Board (PLB) Chair Tim Shackleton has announced the agistment process for pastoralists across the Rangelands had been streamlined to help ensure stock welfare.  

The PLB has authorised the Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage to approve applications on its behalf, to allow the early movement of drought-affected stock between properties. 

This means approval can be granted at any time, rather than pastoralists having to wait for approval at PLB meetings, which are held every two months.

Mr Shackleton said the PLB was committed to ensuring animal welfare on pastoral stations throughout WA.

“Pastoralists across the Rangelands are facing severe dry conditions and we will do everything possible to support them through the challenging season ahead,” he said. 

“By speeding up the agistment process, approved pastoralists will be able to move stock more quickly between stations and ensure animals are safe, with adequate access to food and water. Agistment will also help alleviate overgrazing and land degradation.”

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development Director General Ralph Addis said the change, which would deliver more efficient agistment outcomes for pastoralists encountering tough seasonal conditions, was initiated as a result of the dry season response program. 

“We are working with industry to identify where we can better coordinate our resources and programs to support producers, and continue to maintain a strong focus on animal welfare,” Mr Addis said.

Applicants will still need to meet certain criteria including that the duration of the agistment does not exceed two years. Pastoralists who would like to apply should email plb@plb.wa.gov.au.

Page last reviewed 2 September 2019
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