Living Heritage: Protecting the Aboriginal Cultural Heritage of the Dampier Peninsula

The Report strategically considers the increasing pressures and impacts on the Aboriginal heritage sites, places and cultural landscapes of the remote Dampier Peninsula region of the Kimberley, Western Australia.

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The Report strategically considers the increasing pressures and impacts on the Aboriginal heritage sites, places and cultural landscapes of the remote Dampier Peninsula region of the Kimberley, Western Australia.

Following decades of discussion and planning, the decision was made to seal the remaining sections of the Cape Leveque Road extending from the outskirts of the township of Broome, 200km north to the remote community of Ardyaloon (One Arm Point). As part of this process, requests were made by the Aboriginal people of the Dampier Peninsula to consider associated impacts and develop strategies for the continued protection of the nationally recognised Aboriginal heritage of the area. With pressures of increasing visitor numbers resulting from the improved road access, the Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage (DPLH) undertook a project to consider strategies to address this.

A consultation process was conducted during 2019-2020 with groups, communities and individuals on Aboriginal Sites and Aboriginal Heritage Places that may be impacted by increased visitation and to consider management options and strategies to mitigate the risk. This included consultation with the four Native Title Areas, as represented by the Prescribed Body Corporates (PBCs) of Bardi Jawi, Nyul Nyul, Nimanburr and Gogolanyngor (Jabirr Jabir Ngumbarl), four major Aboriginal communities (Ardyaloon, Djarindjin, Lombadina and Beagle Bay), inaddition to the numerous outstations.

The report details outcomes from the consultation and considers the opportunities and challenges of protecting, managing, sharing and celebrating the Aboriginal cultural heritage of the Dampier Peninsula. The report provides an overview on the importance of protecting and sharing the heritage and culture of the area, followed by reporting of cultural landscapes in each of the determined Native title areas, associated protection and management of those areas and opportunities for sharing and celebrating of this significant heritage.

DPLH, Aboriginal stakeholders and other key government agencies will commence a process to consider opportunities for implementation of the key recommendations.

Page last reviewed 21 May 2021
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